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Thread: Minimum Temperatures to spray Eastwood Paints

  1. #1

    Question Minimum Temperatures to spray Eastwood Paints

    Hi,
    I live in Montana, and it's getting cold early here. What are the minimum temperatures for your urethane and epoxy paints? I just want to know if I can still spray-paint in my (non-heated!) garage, when the outside temperature drops below 30F? And how the low temperatures influence curing times.
    Please let me know min. temperatures for 1) Epoxy Primer, 2) Urethane Primer, 3) Urethane Paint, and 4) Urethane Clear coats. Any other advice on spray-painting in cold climate will be also greatly appreciated. Thanks a lot!

  2. #2
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    Do NOT spray primer or paint at those temps! It will affect everything from curing time, curing properties, adhesion and compatability. The MINIMUM temp for any primer or paint would be about 65F, but manufacturers generally want above 78F. Always read the MSDS (tech) info. Cooler temps (under 80F) increase cure times, affect curing properties and lessen flow-out.
    E-tek Restorations
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  3. #3
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    You don’t want the headaches that could come with using automotive paints at those temperatures. Each automotive refinish product has a different blend of solvents intended to reduce the binders/resins in the formula, and transfer the solid portion of the coating to the vehicle. Once the primer, paint or clear is applied, those solvents flash off, leaving what becomes your dried film. Some of those solvents flash off quickly… they are just there to get the paint from the gun to the panel. Other solvents though, are designed to stay, leaving the film wet for longer, which allows the coating to flow out and level itself. Those slowest solvents probably won’t flash at 60°, so forget about 30°. This means your paint will stay soft (at best) or not even dry at all (at worst).

    Ideally, you want to be at least in the mid-70’s. Any lower than that and you’re risking problems. Is there anything you can do to get heat in the garage prior to painting? Keep in mind, ambient air temperature may be at your 75° target long before the surface of the metal reaches that kind of temperature. As soon as paint hits cold metal, all of the heat is sucked out of it and you may as well be spraying in an unheated garage in Montana…

    This is straight from the "emerald castle" where we design and produce our paints. Take it for gospel.

    Hope that helps!

    -Matt/EW

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattM View Post
    You don’t want the headaches that could come with using automotive paints at those temperatures. Each automotive refinish product has a different blend of solvents intended to reduce the binders/resins in the formula, and transfer the solid portion of the coating to the vehicle. Once the primer, paint or clear is applied, those solvents flash off, leaving what becomes your dried film. Some of those solvents flash off quickly… they are just there to get the paint from the gun to the panel. Other solvents though, are designed to stay, leaving the film wet for longer, which allows the coating to flow out and level itself. Those slowest solvents probably won’t flash at 60°, so forget about 30°. This means your paint will stay soft (at best) or not even dry at all (at worst).

    Ideally, you want to be at least in the mid-70’s. Any lower than that and you’re risking problems. Is there anything you can do to get heat in the garage prior to painting? Keep in mind, ambient air temperature may be at your 75° target long before the surface of the metal reaches that kind of temperature. As soon as paint hits cold metal, all of the heat is sucked out of it and you may as well be spraying in an unheated garage in Montana…

    This is straight from the "emerald castle" where we design and produce our paints. Take it for gospel.

    Hope that helps!

    -Matt/EW
    Awesome reply Matt - nice to have the technical info to back up the reasons not to spray at low temps.
    E-tek Restorations
    Turning rust into rides!
    Check my web site - http://sites.google.com/site/edanneberg/home

  5. #5

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    I know this is an old thread, but how long does it have to maintain mid 70's temperature for all those paints originally posted. I'm also in an unheated garage, and it's in the 70's and 80's during the day, but in the 50's and 60's at night?

  6. #6
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    I would keep it at least 65-70F minimum temperature for the item sprayed for the first 18-24 hours.

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