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Thread: Filling holes

  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by fliptop
    It's all in how you handle the equipment and how hot you run with it. If you don't give the weld a place to go it has nowhere to go but up, which does take more work to grind back down. I use a sharper angle with lighter gages which helps to push the weld out and not up. A little back and forth action also helps to keep it flatter.

  2. #12

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    I usually Mig em too. Never had a problem grinding the welds, warping the panels etc. If the hardness of the filler wire is a concern, they make wires specifically for body panels and easier grinding.

  3. #13

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    I found out when I was replacing the floors on my 68 Olds ninety-eight conv ,which I used donor floors from a 70 Olds ninety-eight ,that has extra supports on the sides and spot welds 1/2 inch after being drilled and having no plug cutters I simply drilled them out to 9/16 inchs and mig welded 1/4 inch bolt washers into the hole then filling the center with a mig . Worked very well and I just recently started welding .

  4. #14

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    I've found that using a MIG backed by a copper spoon I made from a wooden dowel and some 3" copper pipe hammered flat around it, I can fill any hole, up to 1/2 inch or more. Heat control is the issue, but if you can butt-weld sheet metal, filling a hole is no different. Just control the heat and take your time.

    For grinding down the weld afterwords, I use a cut-off wheel (sometimes I'll stack two cutoff wheels to make a wider "footprint") to knock the bead down close to the surrounding surface, then finish it with a grinder and some 80 grit discs. This keeps the heat fairly localized. The other problem with using a sanding disc is that you can inadvertantly grind away too much of the surrounding material making it very thin or even punching through. This technique has made a HUGE improvement in the quality of my welded repairs and usually the surrounding metal is not affected at all. Again, taking your time is the key to quality repairs.
    Matt Harwood
    Cleveland, OH
    My 1941 Buick Century sedanette restoration
    If you have a '41-42 Buick with dual carbs, also be sure to visit The Dual-Carb Registry
    Build a V8 Ranger!

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Far North Coast NSW Australia
    Posts
    44

    Default filling holes

    For simplicity and convenience, small holes can be filled with a mig and preferably a backing plate (copper) thick enough to capture the excess heat. Gasless mig will not make as cleaner job as gas, but the secret is in the angle of delivery. I have had most success with a vertical approach and the shortest possible trigger time. Any hole larger than a five cent piece (nickel for the US) will need to be built up from the edges in a circular pattern inwards.

    Alternatively the larger holes should be plugged with same gauge metal plugs and stitch welded in an alternating pattern to avoid warpage. I also recommend firstly filing a bevel around the inside of the hole to create a course for the weld to sit in. Then grinded down flush, after that, I lead wipe and file finish.

    The washer method is an excellent idea. Use a step drill to cleanly drill out the hole to accommodate the closest size washer.

    If you're worried about heat from the grinding process, use a kinder, but effective flap disc wheel when grinding down the mig weld.

    GJM

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    west seneca,ny
    Posts
    387

    Default holes

    iv done "quite a few" holes,i use a piece of sheet metal(heat sink),behind the hole,and just enough wire to get the metal to stick,grind down if needed,then bondo over,,,looks good,with little bondo..and holds to..
    Bryant E Gorges. www.newlifeautobody.com

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    west seneca,ny
    Posts
    387

    Default holes

    hi//let me re-fraise that...i use .023 mig wire,with a heat sink of some type...or all of the previous methods will work..im doin my 56 belair,and filling in all the chrome holes,,i goin "no chrome",,so i got my hands full...good luck...
    Bryant E Gorges. www.newlifeautobody.com

  8. #18

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    1/4" and smaller holes, especially on an older vehicle like the TR3, are not really a problem to weld, or grind down, as the steel is fairly thick when compared to today's panels. On areas much larger, the idea ov beveling the edges, and welding in a filler piece has worked well for me in the past as well.

    Even if the patch is slightly higher it can be blended into an invisible repair.

    On late model vehicles, you'd definitely want a backer plate/heat sink and some pretty good skills as it doesn't take much heat to warp a panel.

  9. #19

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    I agree with dentman, use a heat sink, aluminum works good too. use a mig welder, not solder. i use a flap disk with an angle grinder. on some of the older cars (1950's) the body had a bead rolled in it. that should be enough to keep warping away. grinding will not heat the panel up to much.

  10. #20

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    Yes!! I am from sweden and are new member here
    and know MUCH about welding and are EXPERT at tig-and mig welding

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