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Thread: Painting chrome parts

  1. #1

    Default Painting chrome parts

    I'm looking for advice on how to paint some chromed grill parts-- I want part of the chromed finish to show, so I can't ruin the chrome finish there. How do I best prepare the surface to hold paint and what sort of primer should I use?
    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    What is the grille made of? Chromed diecast metal? Chromed stamped steel? Stamped aluminum? Or plastic? Different materials will require slightly different attention. For most, I reccomend cleaning thoroughly, masking the areas you want to remain chrome, scuff the areas to be painted with Non-Woven Scuff Pads such as Eastwood's #31346 & #31347. Assuming you want black, I would use Item No. 10042 Z, Trim Paint And Self Etch Primer Kit.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cloud59
    What is the grille made of? Chromed diecast metal? Chromed stamped steel? Stamped aluminum? Or plastic? Different materials will require slightly different attention. For most, I reccomend cleaning thoroughly, masking the areas you want to remain chrome, scuff the areas to be painted with Non-Woven Scuff Pads such as Eastwood's #31346 & #31347. Assuming you want black, I would use Item No. 10042 Z, Trim Paint And Self Etch Primer Kit.
    I suspect the material is chrome stamped steel-- the parts are the horizontal vanes in a '36 Cadillac grill which were entirely chromed, but should only have been so on the leading edge. So my plan is to paint all but the leading 1/8 inch for the sake of authenticity-- suggested color is a fairly light metallic silver-gray. Does this change your suggestion?
    Thanks!

  4. #4
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    Yes, there is a difference. I would still use the scuff pads followed by a light coat of Eastwood # 16014Z Gray Self Etch Primer followed by # 10001Z Silver/Argent.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cloud59
    with Non-Woven Scuff Pads
    What difference would the woven vs. non-woven make?

  6. #6

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    I might recommend using an etching primer under the paint--it may help bite into the chrome plating for better adhesion. If you've got it masked already, this step won't add any difficulty and will improve adhesion. Paint doesn't stick to chrome very well, so the etching properties of the primer will definitely help.
    Matt Harwood
    Cleveland, OH
    My 1941 Buick Century sedanette restoration
    If you have a '41-42 Buick with dual carbs, also be sure to visit The Dual-Carb Registry
    Build a V8 Ranger!

  7. #7

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    89Roadster,
    To address your question concerning the difference between woven and non-woven scuff pads, the non-woven pads are the same technology as the better known 3M product known as Scotch Brite. There isn't a "woven" version of the scuff pads, rather that non-woven is used to describe the material consistency.

    The Butcher

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