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Thread: Homemade english wheel

  1. #1

    Default Homemade english wheel

    I was interested in building an english wheel, i know that there's kits out there to make them or i can machine the wheel and anvils but is there anything else that any of you out there that you guys have used?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Stow,Ohio
    Posts
    129

    Cool Metalman

    Hi Richcharles,
    I use both an English Wheel and a powerhammer. It depends on what you want to do as to which you use most. There are several places where you can buy the plans for different sized wheels and I have seen a unique wheel/powerhammer combo where the wheel had a hammer attached to it and you could set the strokes per minute as you were wheeling. If you could give us a little more info we can give you a better answer. Try going to Tinmantech.com and looking at the different tools and projects made with them. Tell Kent I said hey.
    CmdrRay
    Ye Old Armor Shop

  3. #3

    Default

    Hi Rich
    This all depends on how serious you are about metal shaping. With out knowing your back ground ... you may want to purchase the upper wheel and lower anvills from a reputable manufacture. These are a very critical part of the machine. I know Eastwood sells them seprately as does Hoosier Paterns. Building the frame is no less critical but easier to acomplish. Do your home work and ask lots of questions. When your done you will have a machine that performs nicely for you . In my shop we have Imperial Wheeling machinse and use them very day . Deside what type of work you plan to do and build your wheel machine to handle twice that with room to expand . Your frame should be stout but still have some deflection so when you work over welds and tucks or ruffles you can still pass threw with ease.
    Keep us intouch and let us know how you are progessing . Post photo's if possible.
    Thanks Steve

    Steve's Pro Street
    Danville Pa.
    Pro Sheet metal fab & shaping shop
    30 years in street rod , hot rod , muscle car , high performance sports cars.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Far North Coast NSW Australia
    Posts
    44

    Thumbs up

    I just finished building an air planishing hammer that incorporated an air chisel gun as the hammer. I made planishing dies and welded them onto ground down air chisel attachments. This was probably the trickiest part of the project to get right and centred. It also had to withstand all the blows it would be making, so the welds needed to be good.

    The anvil part was a piece of 50mmD x 250mm solid rod i had in the workshop. I made the dies from the rod. I then made a simple C frame that has reinforced corners for rigidity. I made a simple foot controlled air valve to operate the unit hands free. The air valve mechanism was the most expensive part of the project at about $76. All up the whole thing cost me about $200 in materials, (Australian $), i dont count my time in things like this. An inline oiler is essential so i dont have to dismantle the gun to lubricate.

    I know the proper bought stuff has specially graded and hardened dies and anvils and come with a proper bought price too, but this works fine for me and the restoration jobs it does.

    Here's some pics to check out.
    Attached Images Attached Images   

  5. #5

    Default

    Great Job GJM looks like that should give you lots of service. What type of restoration do you do.
    Thanks Steve

    Steve's Pro Street
    Danville Pa.
    Pro Sheet metal fab & shaping shop
    30 years in street rod , hot rod , muscle car , high performance sports cars.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Far North Coast NSW Australia
    Posts
    44

    Default

    Thanks mate, Im currently...well, for the past 5 years....restoring a 53 Pontiac 4 door. It's a slow process, but ive completed a lot of the hidden bits and now im up to the large stuff like cutting out rust etc. I have to replace most of the front floor halfway up the firewall as well as most of the boot floor, (trunk to you guys), and little bits around the back of the tail lights. The body is currently separated from the chassis and im cleaning the chassis down at the moment.

    So i am in the need for specialist metal working tools. I have a set of shrinker/stretchers and i bought the economy eastwood bead roller that actually does a great job. I made my own folding brake and blast cabinet years ago and lately i thought of making the planishing hammer. I had an air chisel set so i looked at a few examples online to get an idea on the fabrication.

    I'll be fabricating an english wheel next and im deciding whether to buy one of the wheel kits or have some turned up locally. All the kits seem to be from the US and the conversion rate and postage is a bit steep so if i can get them done locally it might be cheaper. I havent looked into it yet.

    It's a never ending saga, but at least it keeps me out of trouble!

    Here's a pic of the Poncho.

    cheers,
    GJM.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by GJM; 05-14-2006 at 09:27 PM. Reason: add pics

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Stow,Ohio
    Posts
    129

    Cool Planishing hammer

    Hi Gjm,
    I make my own heads for my power hammer and I use a product called Kasenite from MSCDIRECT.COM to case harden them. It works pretty well and I haven't had any problems with the heads mushrooming out on either end. What you need to have to use this stuff is an oxy/acetylene torch or a very hot oven because you need to get the metal red hot. The price isn't to bad, about $12 US for a pint, and it comes in a powdered form. You can heat treat the part several times to get a deeper case hardening effect.
    The hammer you made looks great.
    If you have your wheel and anvils made locally tell the machine shop doing it that you need a number 8 finish on them. The finish in the wheels is the finish you will get on the metal. If you have watched any videos on using the wheel by John Glover or Ron Covell you will notice that the surface of the metal when they are done looks almost like a mirror. That is because of the finish on the wheel.
    Good luck on your car and have fun in the shop.
    CmdrRay
    Ye Old Armor Shop

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Far North Coast NSW Australia
    Posts
    44

    Thumbs up

    Thanks for that info Cmdrray, I suspected after a while the heads will start to deform as im not sure what the hardness of the rod was that i made them from and i havent really put the hammer through a hard days work yet either.

    Never having to contend with the process before, i wasnt really sure of how to do it. I will be making a few more heads with different radiuses in the future so i might try it out.
    One question though- After the head has been heated up to red hot, do you then dip it in a solution made from the powder, or straight in the powder? I assume there'd be a limit to how many times because the head would become too brittle?

    As for the english wheel, what ideal size for the top wheel do you recommend as i notice there are wheels from 6" dia to 9" dia. in various widths. Id reckon the larger and wider the better for 19-20 gage panelwork? Some of the smaller ones look too light and narrow to me.
    Thanks again,
    GJM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Oklahoma City
    Posts
    12

    Default

    Eastwood has a great kit in their catalog.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    East Meadow, New York
    Posts
    407

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cmdrray
    Hi Gjm,
    I make my own heads for my power hammer and I use a product called Kasenite from MSCDIRECT.COM to case harden them. It works pretty well and I haven't had any problems with the heads mushrooming out on either end. What you need to have to use this stuff is an oxy/acetylene torch or a very hot oven because you need to get the metal red hot. The price isn't to bad, about $12 US for a pint, and it comes in a powdered form. You can heat treat the part several times to get a deeper case hardening effect.
    The hammer you made looks great.
    If you have your wheel and anvils made locally tell the machine shop doing it that you need a number 8 finish on them. The finish in the wheels is the finish you will get on the metal. If you have watched any videos on using the wheel by John Glover or Ron Covell you will notice that the surface of the metal when they are done looks almost like a mirror. That is because of the finish on the wheel.
    Good luck on your car and have fun in the shop.
    Is that stuff phosphorous based or phosphorescent?

    It gives off light if it is.

    If it is, the way it works is very cool. It takes the heat rays coming off the part, and accelerates them into the ultraviolet and x-ray band and removes an enormous amount of energy from the part, super cooling it in the process.

    I am going to go and check it out, I have wanted to get a can for some time. Thanks.

    Sincerely,

    William McCormick
    Nuts and bolts

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