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Thread: Blasting Ruins Future Paint?

  1. #11
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    Yes, I have seen a number of magazine articles and TV shows featuring Soda Blasting. Anyone have any experience with it?

  2. #12

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    Make sure to use a good dust mask. This will keep your lungs from being ground up by the dust generated. It does not take much dust to ruin your lungs for life.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cloud59
    Yes, I have seen a number of magazine articles and TV shows featuring Soda Blasting. Anyone have any experience with it?
    Last fall I restored a '68 RoadRunner that had at least 4 paint jobs on it. After talking it over with the vehicles owner we decided to have it soda-blasted. It did a wonderfull job of removing the paint but was aprox. $1800.00 to do the entire vehicle shell and all the bolt on parts. (this did include spot sandblasting of the rusty areas and edges)

    One thing to ask (and we didn't) the blaster is if they use a dry or wet process. This blaster used what could be described as a soda pressure washer. Their main business was industrial food equipment, not cars. It left a ton of caked-on soda in all of the nooks and cranies which required me to do a lenthy washing of the bare metal. Not exactly what I like to do to bare metal .

    The other problem I had with soda blasting was the condition of the metal after blasting. The surface was soooo smooth. I didn't trust the etching primer alone to hold the paint on so I lightly sanded the metal to make sure I had enough adhesion. Weather or not I would have had to sand it is up for debate but when restoring a car, why chance it.
    Chris'
    Autobody
    Restoration
    Service

    www.carsofcomfrey.com

    Comfrey MN

    William McCormick "I am not an expert, but I do know some basics that are often not known by many."

  4. #14

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    Poky-
    Myself, I would see if you can find a company nearby that does coating removal with a baking soda blaster. Baking soda blasting was developed to restore the inside of the Statue of Liberty, and since has proven to be a highly successful coating removal system. It will take off your paint, but will not pit the surface like sand or coal slag will. Also, it won't heat up the metal or warp it like traditional methods do. Additionally, clean-up is a snap compared to "Black Beauty". Vacuum up the interior stuff, rinse down whatever is laying around outside. Go see www.problastusa.com, and watch the video where they use soad to blast the paint off a vintage Corvette.

  5. #15
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    Many great points. Did anyone ask what type of sandblaster? Pressure or siphon feed? Along with the good information stated by others, blasting will be easier if it is a pressure blaster. You will use less media than a siphon blaster (generally) because you have better control of the amount of media forced out of the blast tip. Yes stripper would be easier on the surface and will remove body filler by softening it better than blasting, especially if there is more than one paint job.Then take a putty knife to scrape out the soft filler. Unless you have commercial type equipment, siphon feed blasting equipment could take a long time, run the heck out of your compressor and yes damage or warp the surface of the panels if you get too close or concentrate blasting on one area for too long. (like body filler or heavy rust, painted on stripes and signage or lettering)
    Blasting can be a good way to strip paint and remove rust, just be careful.
    I suggest chemical stripping the car since its not very big, clean off the stripper well not to leave residue. Only blast the areas that are rusty, using care on center parts of the panel or use the liquid metal cleaner for removing rust. Older VW parts are fairly stout but you could still make some extra work for yourself if you are not careful.
    It may be best to leave the complete media stripping jobs to the big boys who have the experience. Its a nasty job and can be harmful to the person blasting if not wearing the proper safety equipment. (just like everything)
    Freerider

  6. #16
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    - CARS, thanks for the input on Soda Blasting the Road Runner especially with the tip on the wet blasting.

    - Wynder, thanks for the Problastusa link and th video on blasting the 57 Vette. That looks like a heavy duty commercial unit.

    My 59 Vette was done in acrylic laquer back in 1975 and is now starting to show it's age. I am considering Soda Blasting it and would like the convenience of doing it at home. I have read about a few smaller units being used. Anyone have any experience with that equipment?
    Last edited by Cloud59; 02-02-2006 at 11:06 AM. Reason: Spelling

  7. #17

    Default Some Answers

    We have alot of inquiries and questions about media blasting from users of this forum. As such I thought I would reply in person. I am Steve Lawrence - founder of ProblastUSA. www.problastusa.com
    Media blasting is abrasive or non abrasive - for auto restoration you will need both. Non-abrasive for the panels of the car to avoid warpage and abrasive for rust removal on frames, inside trunks, engine compartments and some parts. Our equipment is the only equipment in the world that will handle both abrasive and non. Remember when soda blasting is complete prior to paint you do need to neutralize it, it leaves a caustic residue that must come off for the adhesion of paint. If you contact a blaster ask what media they use and don't just settle for sand or soda there are many other options out there. Kieserite, crushed glass, starblast etc.... Good Luck with your projects! If you have any questions you can email me directly. Steve Lawrence President ProBlast Inc. sales@problastusa.com

  8. #18

    Default Soda Blasting

    Cars,
    Chris, yes soda blasting is an unregulated industry.
    AND soda blasting is not the be all end all. We share our information freely and if you need any information about types of blasting, questions to ask what to look for, I would be very happy to answer your questions. Soda does not etch metal! This is a catch 22, if it etched metal it would warp the panels, but it does leave it very smooth and will not etch glass. Yes it does leave a very smooth profile, I would never recommend painting over a soda blasted surface without prepping first, you will need to etch the surface, use a DA sander, light brush blast of abrasive or some guys use a vinyl etching primer. I do know that the caustic properties of soda and the fact that you need to neutralize with vinegar and water or citric acid are a turn off to the use of soda. Nobody wants to throw water on bare metal! The other non caustic medias are now preferred. Consider having your projects restored with kieserite, super K, calcium carbonate etc...

    ProBlast has been featured on Dream Car Garage and ASK Jon Eakes Show....

  9. #19

    Default Units

    Cloud 59, The ProBlast CRS is a small enough portable unit, that does heavy duty work, getting a smaller unit is like using a pencil to paint a barn. We only have one unit these units are in guys garages and large restorers have the same units that work every day of the year!

  10. #20

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    Just to add something new. Last week one of my customers gave me a body shell that was blasted with ash. He didn't know all the details, and I don't have the time right now to go check this out but I must say it is a awesome surface!
    All the edges were sandblasted to remove any rust but all the flat exterior surfaces were done with this ash and it is not as rough as the sand blasted areas yet not as smooth as I remember soda blasting to be. I still used my DA to prep the exterior just because I feel more secure about the primer adhesion. The best thing is that I didn't have to nuetralize the surface. I just DA'ed it, blew it off, wiped it down with wax and grease remover and proceeded to prime it.
    Does anyone else know of using ash as a blasting media???
    Chris'
    Autobody
    Restoration
    Service

    www.carsofcomfrey.com

    Comfrey MN

    William McCormick "I am not an expert, but I do know some basics that are often not known by many."

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