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Thread: another sandblasting question.

  1. #11

    Talking

    Got the answer I need, thanks!

  2. #12

    Default

    Hey guys... I'm gonna be new to this hobby... I'm pretty crafty but wanted to get some ideas. I ordered a pressurized sand blaster which holds 40lbs and seems to be pretty good. I read the pressurized blasters are better than siphon fed ones. I also ordered a 50lbs of glass beads medium size.. My blasting cabinet will be built by me. I was thinking of a cabinet similar to all the cabinets you see and I was going to hook up a shop vac and put a air filter in between (I remember seeing big air filters at Kmart for like $3-4). I was going to make the cabinet air tight so all the dust gets sucked in and also I wanted to make a funnelled trap door on the bottom to reclaim all my glass beads. Now... Lets start with an intake manifold... mildly cleaned. So no big grease gunks etc... Should I blast it with 10lbs of glass first and keep recycling that until its fairly clean and then use fresh glass at the end or what? Will reusing glass beads keep getting dirtier and dirtier preventing an aluminum intake from getting as clean? I didn't buy a parts washer yet so it's going to be hand washing for now but once I have a parts washer it will be easier.... Also any tips and tricks I should learn. I'm gonna use a cartridge respirator since they're fairly cheap and I rather not inhale the dust.



    How does this look??? I figure the filter will be big like 12 x 12 inches because it will get dirty otherwise quickly...

    Thanks!!

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    michigan
    Posts
    697

    Default

    NewbieCoater sounds like a good plan for blasting. as for the glass beads getting dirty, that is not so much a concern if the part is degreased as good as possible before blasting. the beads will however break down as they are used so the idea of recycling them will work for a period then they will be nothing more than glass dust and will loose their effectiveness. at that point you should use new beads. respirator is a necessity when blasting with any media.
    when in doubt polish it out. why replace it when you can refinish it.
    G2 Polishing and Powdercoating
    cliff

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Stow,Ohio
    Posts
    129

    Cool Metalman

    Quote Originally Posted by NewbieCoater
    Hey guys... I'm gonna be new to this hobby... I'm pretty crafty but wanted to get some ideas. I ordered a pressurized sand blaster which holds 40lbs and seems to be pretty good. I read the pressurized blasters are better than siphon fed ones. I also ordered a 50lbs of glass beads medium size.. My blasting cabinet will be built by me. I was thinking of a cabinet similar to all the cabinets you see and I was going to hook up a shop vac and put a air filter in between (I remember seeing big air filters at Kmart for like $3-4). I was going to make the cabinet air tight so all the dust gets sucked in and also I wanted to make a funnelled trap door on the bottom to reclaim all my glass beads. Now... Lets start with an intake manifold... mildly cleaned. So no big grease gunks etc... Should I blast it with 10lbs of glass first and keep recycling that until its fairly clean and then use fresh glass at the end or what? Will reusing glass beads keep getting dirtier and dirtier preventing an aluminum intake from getting as clean? I didn't buy a parts washer yet so it's going to be hand washing for now but once I have a parts washer it will be easier.... Also any tips and tricks I should learn. I'm gonna use a cartridge respirator since they're fairly cheap and I rather not inhale the dust.



    How does this look??? I figure the filter will be big like 12 x 12 inches because it will get dirty otherwise quickly...

    Thanks!!
    hi Newbiecoater,
    When you build your blast cabinet you do not want it to be airtight if you are going to hook up a shop vac. At the side oposite the shop vac connection you will need an air inlet to equalize pressure and admit fresh air so the shop vac can suck out the dusty air. I have built my own too and it works well. Your design looks good but be sure to put a baffle of some kind inside the cabinet in front of the vac connection to prevent blast media from going straight out the vac line. Put one behind the fresh air inlet too and a small piece of furnace filter or other kind of filter ( on the outside of the cabinet )that will let air flow in while stopping any stray media from getting out.
    Good luck
    CmdrRay
    Ye Old Armor Shop

  5. #15

    Default just wondering

    i just started sandblasting and came to this site to get info for help i saw these replys about how dangerous sand is with or without a respirator. my question is, if sand is really that bad, why do we have sandboxes for our kids to play in and why don't millions of people at beaches wear respirators to prevent breathing sand? i was wondering if this is one of those topics like smoking was in the 50's and 60's, where nobody really knew how harmful it was. today, everyone knows how dangerouse it is. if this is a similar issue, then i'm really concerned because all 4 of my kids had sandboxes when they were little which means i've inadvertantly exposed them to silicosis. it would also mean no more trips to the beach which we have done every year. what next?

  6. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lee morrison
    i just started sandblasting and came to this site to get info for help i saw these replys about how dangerous sand is with or without a respirator. my question is, if sand is really that bad, why do we have sandboxes for our kids to play in and why don't millions of people at beaches wear respirators to prevent breathing sand? i was wondering if this is one of those topics like smoking was in the 50's and 60's, where nobody really knew how harmful it was. today, everyone knows how dangerouse it is. if this is a similar issue, then i'm really concerned because all 4 of my kids had sandboxes when they were little which means i've inadvertantly exposed them to silicosis. it would also mean no more trips to the beach which we have done every year. what next?
    I'll hazard a guess here, but its just that. As you use the sand in the blaster and it hits the parts, it breaks down into dust. Its the dust that is hazardous.
    Mike
    Customs by Mike
    www.thepowdercoater.com

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    michigan
    Posts
    697

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 2003z
    I'll hazard a guess here, but its just that. As you use the sand in the blaster and it hits the parts, it breaks down into dust. Its the dust that is hazardous.
    bingo the sand is not the hazard. when dustborn it becomes a danger. it is like smoking was, in that alot of people dont know, and and it is something that will hurt you later on not right away.
    when in doubt polish it out. why replace it when you can refinish it.
    G2 Polishing and Powdercoating
    cliff

  8. #18

    Default

    Newbie, I use an industrial blasting hood and Cmdrray is correct. You need to make sure you have a way to equalize the pressure. The unit I use has a vacuum system to keep the dust done and has an inlet so that the unit does not build negative pressure when sealed well. Otherwise, it sounds like you have a good plan for a home system.

    As far as the sand/silicosis issue goes, I highly doubt play sand/beach sand will cause longterm problems. The danger with using sand is creating the dust without having proper breathing protection. Silicosis is the result of silica getting into the lungs and causing scarring of the tissue. Your body has a hard time getting silica out of it. Therefore, longterm/multiple exposure with time becomes an issue. Think of "blacklung" that occurred with coal-mine workers with many years of exposure to coal dust. The other main problem with the use of sand is lawyers. As with anything in today's "sue or be sued" society, lawyers have found another thing to cash in on. Therefore, any supplier of blasting media now has a liability issue on their hands. Does this mean silicosis does not exist? No. It does occur if you spend a lot time breathing the dust. But, since there exists other alternatives to sand, most times these would be of choice. As with anything in life, what you allow to enter you body can have longterm impacts. Smoking causes cancer, alcohol causes liver damage, fatty foods causes clogged arteries and breathing water will cause you to drown. Some choices are a personal lifestyle decision or others can be prevented. So, if you use sand, wear a respirator. And if you go to the beach, just make sure the kids aren't snorting the sand....otherwise they will be fine.

    Another side thought with any blasting media: Would I blast parts outside of a hood without a repirator? NO. I prefer not to find out that the longterm effects of other materials caused various health problems. Just common sense.
    "There are two people in life. Those with loaded guns and those that dig. You dig."

  9. #19

    Default

    Here's an article from NIOSH regarding sandblasting:

    http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/92-102.html

  10. #20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 6t7goat
    I just got one of the el cheapo harbor freight blasting cabs. Im trying to keep the mess to a minimum. It says to only use glass bead. Why no sand, alum oxide, etc. I hear glass bead is good but it breaks down fast. Any body have any experience with different types of media and why I should or shouldnt use it. 90% of what I blast will be to powder coat. Thanks for any tips. Mike
    The warning may be because of the way the cabinet is built. Thin walled cheap interrior panels may get destroyed and even blown through eventually so they suggest glass beads which are more suited for polishing surfaces and are far less agressive as opposed to garnet, coal slag or black beauty as some call it which removes material when blasting. A friend of mine placed cheap plywood panels inside against the side and back walls to prevent damage to his cabinet. Don't forget unprotected areas can still be viloated by flow patterns inside the cabnet area.
    "Restore Them, Don't Crush Them"

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